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Brian’s “Hot 200” movie list

October 5th, 2010 · 6 Comments · Movies

This is a work-in-progress . . . but it’s a helluva good list of movies . . .

Even if this list makes someone see just one great movie that they never have, it’s worth it.

rear-window-poster

Brian’s Top Dozen Movies:
(movies that are essentially perfect — every shot, every word, every scene, roughly speaking)

Rear Window
Treasure of The Sierra Madre
In The Heat of The Night

Woodstock
Goodfellas
The Sting

Fargo
Cat On A Hot Tin Roof
Forrest Gump

Matewan
Round Midnight
It’s A Mad Mad Mad Mad World

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title(s): “Movies to See — Four or More and Lots of Stars”

This is not a list of what you necessarily think are “the greatest movies of all time” but rather a list of the movies you’ve actually watched all the way thru a minimum of 4 times (maybe this should be 3) and could watch ten more.

Seeing a movie twice is very different than seeing it three or four times. we all see a lot of movies once, then maybe a second time passively with a friend. but it’s when you intentionally watch it for a third and especially a fourth time that the film crosses a line into a special category.

some say there’s no point in watching a movie twice, or they’re too busy. but I say: can you only look at a great painting once? Or listen to a great song or read a great book once?
The only reason movies are listed is based on the number times watched – not whether you want to say you liked it or not, or that you recommend it, or think it’s one of the great films of all time. those are different lists – for critics and academics and film institutes and such. this is Your List, a People’s List, and Actually Watched List. And it’s a game as you fill in your own puzzle, make your own movie of your life’s movies. what you’ve watched, not what you should have watched, or fib or pretend that you’ve watched, or wished you’d watched more than once. I wouldn’t put “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off” on a Greatest Films list, or even want to admit I watched it three times – but I know I have. And that’s part of the discovery of going down this path.

You must have physically — and joyously. sat thru the entire movie many times, not just done it in your head, and not just watched it once then seen snippets a few times. and you should really really want to watch it again, like, right now.

If you can’t remember the movie in great detail, you probably didn’t see it 3 or 4 times. You should be able to recount the plot, the arc, lots of key scenes, the actors, and parts of the dialog in detail.
The movie should give you chills or goosebumps, or make you laugh yourself silly, or cry at some point. in the best cases, several of the above.

do Not list movies you’ve only seen twice! it’s very tempting to embellish your memory.  You have to really think about it to confirm you’ve actually seen the whole thing 3 times.
You could have seen a movie once or twice and it really stuck with you, but those don’t count.
Also – it Really doesn’t count if you started to watch it one more time but then didn’t see it all the way thru! — we’ve all got Lots of those!
Also – it doesn’t count if you Want to see the movie a 3rd time. if you want, you can start a “seen twice and wanna see more” list for these movies

Also – don’t worry that some movies make it on the list because your all-movie cable network happened to be playing them in heavy rotation for weeks or months. I would never have seen the great Cage & Travolta performances in “Face/Off” if it wasn’t on some digi movie net when I was homebound for a spell. You catch a few minutes flippin the channels one day, and go, “Hmm, this is actually pretty good.” then you make a point to catch it from the beginning, and then it’s so good, you watch it again. and then once you get the rhythms of it, the different subtexts, and subliminal themes, and subtleties of performance, you can really enjoy watching it a third time as an insider playing in the orchestra and riding the score, the arcs, hit the cymbal-crashing peaks, and rise to the top with the solos while simultaneously keeping the beat with the supporting melody-players.  Do you want to hear Tchaikovsky’s “1812 Overture” only once in your life? Those rare moments in art where it all comes together. Nobody’s ever even heard of his “1811 Overture” because it probably sucked.

And films are even harder to create than a symphony. there are so many variables that all have to come together. the weather — see “Lost In La Mancha”, or a problem actor — see “Heart of Darkness, A Filmmaker’s Apocalypse”., or meddling producers — see “Hollywood Ending”. or a cheesy script — see ?
You remember the first time you saw a movie – the discovery, the unfolding, the first impressions.
And you know if you saw a second time – when you knew what was happening and what was coming.
And you should remember the third time – when you could really relish in it, dance with it — or realized you’ve seen it enough and you won’t be coming back..
And you know you’ve seen a movie four times because you’ve almost memorized it, played right along with it, became one with it.
Then there’s the Watched-A-Ridiculous-Amount-of-Times List. these are the movies that have really become a part of you.
Also – Screen Size Does Matter: I’ve said it once and I’ll say it again: “You can’t really say you’ve seen a movie unless you’ve seen it on the big screen. That’s what they’re made for.” And I still stand by that.  But for me — and most people — usually the repeat viewings occur on a TV at home.  And that’s okay.

Also — there are lots of great movies not on this cuz I didn’t like them enough to watch them more than twice, and there’s lots I just haven’t seen four times but I want to; say, Dr. Strangelove, Touch of Evil, the Maltese Falcon.

Also — older movies have an advantage since they’ve been able to play over and over again on TV for so much of your lifetime.

A few movies will also make anyone’s list because they were an old girlfriend or boyfriend’s favorite. that’s okay, too. If you’ve seen it 4 times, you’ve seen it 4 times.

The most important thing is to be honest in putting all movies on the list and not editing the truth. it makes a more interesting, fun and complete picture.

It’s useful to make this list for yourself as you’ll discover directors you didn’t know you liked so much – and then check out or reconsider their other films.
This really amounts to: Brian’s Required Viewing – If I was to teach a film course, this would be the curriculum.
or recommend movies for friends to rent. if people shared their lists, you’d have a list a great movies to rent — for when you can’t think of one..
It should also have the “Oh, Yeah!” factor – when somebody reads down the list they suddenly remember a movie they always wanted to see, or saw once and always wanted to see again.
The idea is: every one of these movies has to be great or I wouldn’t have watched it four times. if you had passed on the movie for some reason, my hope is you’ll reconsider.

a greatest movie shouldn’t have a bad scene or subplot in the movie.
what are the commonalities with these films?

Lesser known Character actors that rock:
Jane Adams
JT Walsh
William Hickey
Warren Oates

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Movies I’ve watched so many times I’ve lost count. say, at least 7 or more times.

The Watched-A-Ridiculous-Amount-of-Times List:
(all these movies ARE ON the master list already)

Woodstock
Festival Express
The Last Waltz
Goodfellas
It’s A Mad Mad Mad Mad World (as a kid)
Jesus Christ Superstar
The Sting
Don’t Look Back
Masked & Anonymous
One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest
The Shining
Rebel Without a Cause
A Hard Days Night
Fargo
Lucky Numbers
Star Wars (as a kid)
Fawlty Towers
The Civil War series (PBS, Ken Burns)
Round Midnight
My Cousin Vinny
Groundhog Day
Forrest Gump
In The Heat Of The Night
Primary Colors
Cat On A Hot Tin Roof
Treasure of The Sierra Madre

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format:
Title — year; director; writer; stars; notes.

my 4+ times watched movies:
— in the order I thought of them.

Rear Window — 1954; Alfred Hitchcock; Jimmy Stewart & Grace Kelly, Thelma Ritter, Raymond Burr.
Fargo — Coen brothers.
Lucky Numbers — Nora Ephron.
State & Main — Mamet.
Goodfellas — Scorsese.
The Sting — George Roy Hill.
Woodstock — Wadleigh.
The Last Waltz — Scorsese.
Festival Express — Bob Smeaton.
In The Heat of The Night — 1967; Norman Jewison (Torontonian); Sidney Pottier, Rod Steiger, Warren Oates, Lee Grant, Anthony James (creepy diner guy); “They call me Mr. Tibbs.”
This is such a masterpiece, but so many people don’t know it. Just tonight I’d sent out an email to get people to catch the PBS airing of it, and a few did, one writing to ask me if this was a “cult classic”? 🙂

I’ve watched it many times — and next time FULLY dig and study the ancillary music — It’s all Quincy Jones, and all the piano playing is Ray Charles.

also listen for the diversity and both musical styles and instrumentation. I don’t know if this won awards for the music, but boy it sure shoulda.

This is an amazing movie for blind people.
It almost sounds as good at it looks.

The Talented Mr. Ripley — Anthony Minghella.
The Curse of The Jade Scorpion — Woody Allen.
Airport — 1970; George Seaton; from Arthur Hailey novel; Dean Martin, George Kennedy, Burt Lancaster, Jacqueline Bisset, Helen Hayes, Van Heflen (bomber), Maureen Stapleton.
It’s A Mad Mad Mad Mad World — 1963!; Stanley Kramer; Buddy Hackett & Mickey Rooney, Ethel Merman & Phil Silvers, Jonathan Winters, Milton Berle, Spencer Tracey, and a ton of cameos!
The Player — 1992; Robert Altman; Michael Tolkin; Tim Robbins, Vincent D’Onofrio, Fred Ward, Cynthia Stevenson, Whoopi Goldberg, Dean Stockwell, Lyle Lovett, and million cameos.
Matewan — John Sayles.
Best In Show — Christopher Guest.
Don’t Look Back — D.A. Pennebaker.
Psycho — Alfred Hitchcock.
North By Northwest — (1959) Alfred Hitchcock; Gary Grant, Eva Marie Saint, James Mason, Martin Landau — GREAT script and cinematography – great Manhattan location shots circa 1958; great Mount Rushmore shots

Forrest Gump — Robert Zemeckis.
Masked & Anonymous — 2003; Larry Charles; Dylan.
Star Wars — George Lucas.
Spinal Tap — Rob Reiner.
The Big Chill — Lawrence Kasdan.
Happy Birthday Wanda June — Mark Robson; written Kurt Vonnegut; Rod Steger, William Hickey amazing performance
One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest — Milos Foreman.
The Shining — Stanley Kubrick.
The Big Picture — Christopher Guest!. Kevin Bacon
Memento — Chris Nolan.

The Wizard of Oz — Victor Fleming.
Monty Python and the Holy Grail — Terry Gilliam.
Butch Cassidy & The Sundance Kid — George Roy Hill.
Groundhog Day — Harold Ramis.
What About Bob? — Frank Oz.
Rebel Without A Cause — Nick Ray.
Citizen Kane — Wells.
Annie Hall — Allen.
Young Frankenstein — Mel Brooks.
Hudsucker Proxy — Coen brothers.

Round Midnight — Bertrand Tavernier.
Beat The Devil — 1953; John Huston; Humphrey Bogart, Peter Lorre, Jennifer Jones, Robert Morley. I can’t believe these guys (Houston, Bogart, Jones) weren’t comedic actors & director. this is SO funny – if you look at it right. Morley is Brilliant. and the dialog is brilliant. I would love to have this script. this is one of my favorite movies of all time. there’s also so many plot changes. great characterizations. Jennifer Jones out Marilyn’s Monroe in 1953 playing the most wonderfully dreamy and deluded blond. The Talented Mr. Ripley is a kind of later version (although that’s not a comedy).
The Planet of The Apes — Franklin Shaffner.
A Streetcar Named Desire — Kazan.
Pull My Daisy — Robert Frank & Alfred Leslie.
Lust For Life — Vincente Minelli, father of Liza.
Cat On A Hot Tin Roof — Richard Brooks. – it’s all about the acting. and sex.
Dead Poets Society — Peter Weir.
The Poseidon Adventure — 1973; Ronald Neame.
Paper Moon — Peter Bogdanovich.

Jesus Christ Superstar! — Norman Jewison!; Ted Neally.
Hair — Milos Foreman; Treat Williams, Beverly De Angelo. fantastic
Secret Window — 2004; David Koepp; (from a Stephen King novel; starring Johnny Depp, John Turturro; music Philip Glass.
Throw Mama From The Train — Danny DeVito.
The War of The Roses — Danny DeVito.
Funny Farm — 1988; George Roy Hill; Chevy Chase writer-in-the-country comedy.
Big Business — Jim Abrahams; starring Better Midler & Lily Tomlin.
The Ladykillers — 2004; Coen Brothers.
That Thing You Do! — dir & written by Tom Hanks!.
The Haunting — Jan de Bont; starring Catherine Zeta-Jones.

A Hard Day’s Night — Richard Lester; starring The Beatles.
Apocalypse Now — Coppola.
Fast Times At Ridgemont High — 1982; Any Heckerling; written Cameron Crowe; starring Sean Penn, Jennifer Jason Leigh, Phoebe Cates.
Bonnie & Clyde — 1967; Arthur Penn; starring Warren Beatty, Faye Dunaway.
The Devil’s Advocate — 1997; Taylor Hackford; Al Pacino, Charlize Theron, Keanu Reeves, Jeffrey Jones.
Jaws — 1975; Stephen Spielberg; Peter Benchley novel & screenplay; Richard Dreyfuss, Roy Schnieder, Robert Shaw.
Sling Blade! — 1996.
The Untouchables
The Blues Brothers!
Sleuth — 1972; Joseph Mankiewicz; written by Anthony Schaffer; Lawrence Oliver, Michael Caine.

Deathtrap — 1982; Sidney Lumet; Michael Caine, Christopher Reeve, Dyan Cannon.
The World According to Garp
Broadcast News
Harold and Maude!!
Being There!
The French Connection!
MASH!!!
Cabaret!
Duck Soup! — Freedonia!. — 1933, Leo McCarey; Groucho, Chico, Harpo, Zeppo Marx, Margaret Dumont.
Swiss Family Robinson!

The Ghost and Mr. Chicken!!!! — Don Knotts! — have on VHS, with captions
Quiz Show!!
Yellow Submarine!
Meet The Parents
Ghost
Ghostbusters
The Birdcage!
Animal House!
My Cousin Vinny!!
Cast Away

Chitty Chitty Bang Bang
Breakdown! — 1997; Jonathon Mostow; Kurt Russell, J.T. Walsh, Kathleen Quinlan.
Trading Places — 1983; John Landis; Dan Aykroyd, Eddie Murphy, Jamie Lee Curtis, Ralph Bellamy, Don Ameche.
Beetlejuice! — 1988; Tim Burton; Michael Keaton, Winona Ryder, Geena Davis, Alec Baldwin, Catherine O’Hara, Jeffrey Jones, Robert Goulet, Dick Cavett; Keaton’s only on scene 17 min., but with Burton’s permission, totally created the vibe of the movie, and is his favorite movie that he’s in..
A Fish Called Wanda!! — 1988; Charles Crichton; John Cleese, Michael Palin, Jamie Lee Curtis, Kevin Kline. brilliant.
The Candidate — Robert Redford, Peter Boyle.
Thelma & Louise! — Susan Sarandon & Geena Davis.
Witches of Eastwick — Nicholson, Pfiffer, Sarandon, Cher.
The Gods Must Be Crazy! — 1980; dir & written by Jamie Uys; starring N!xau, Marius Weyers, Sandra Prinsloo.
The Odd Couple! — 1968; Gene Saks; Neil Simon; Walter Matthau & Jack Lemmon

The Aristocrats — 2005; Paul Provenza (and Penn Jillette); featuring nearly every comedian you’ve ever heard of, but the key & funniest ones I remember are: Gilbert Gottfried, Bob Saget, Drew Carey, Sarah Silverman, Paul Reiser, George Carlin, Andy Dick, Martin Mull, Mario Cantone (as Liza Minelli), Kevin Pollak (as Christopher Walkin), Eric Meed the card trick guy, and South Park.

* Dogtown and Z-Boys — memorizing “birth of skateboarding” documentary — 2001; dir: Stacy Peralta (the famous guy), Jay Adams, Tony Alva; Craig Stecyk (original writer & photographer); narrator: Sean Penn;

The Sunshine Boys – 1975; dir. Herb Ross, written by Neil Simon; Walter Matthau & George Burns; best scenes are the 2 in Willy’s (Matthau’s) apt. where they rehearse and reminisce (have on Aristocrats VHS); brilliant portrayal of aging entertainers; love the city vs. the country combative theme

Salesman – the 200th film added to my list! filmed in 1966, released in 1969; Maysles Brothers riveting masterpiece documentary about four door-to-door Bible salesmen. starts outside Boston (Webster, Mass), then they go down to Miami. first saw in Phyllis’s kitchen. seen twice. will be my 200th film in the list! what’s amazing is the complete breakdown on one of the salesmen . REWATCH/LISTEN TO COMMENTARY – he explains HOW he makes them — empathy: from commentary: Albert Maysles became lifelong friends with Paul Brennan (the guy who lost it). David Maysles loved Arthur Miller plays, would see them multiple times. just the two of them, no assistant. David on sound (directional microphone, into a customized Nagra to record for 15 times at a time), Albert on camera (weighted 20 pounds; had early zoom lens). he says — took 30 years to get it on TV. shot 100 hours, boiled down to 90 min. cost $200-300,000!!! the processing of the film. the editor’s salary (the woman)

National Lampoon’s Vacation – 1983 – dir; Harold Ramis; written by John Hughes, Chevy Chase, Beverly D’Angelo, Randy Quad, Imogene Coca
National Lampoon’s European Vacation – 1985 – dir. Amy Heckerling; written by John Hughes; Chevy Chase, Beverly D’Angelo,
The Treasure of The Sierra Madre — John Huston. his father, Walter Huston, won Best Supporting Actor; plus Huston for both directing and screenplay
For me it was one of those movies i had to see more than once to appreciate. i started watching it once or twice and found it REEEALLY boring — these old farts trudging around the desert and pawing in the dirt. Whoopy! was it actually filmed in slow motion?

then . . . ah, Then . . . on the 2nd or 3rd try all the pieces came together and now i recognize its mastery and why it’s one of the greatest films ever made. The original story, perhaps dating back to Chaucer, who could’ve picked it up from somebody else. Maybe it’s a lost Homer epic. The story is eternal. Like “absolute power corrupts absolutely.”

how greed can overpower an otherwise good man. how some, in the face of wealth, become a-holes, and others always retain a clear vision of what’s important in life (Howard/Walter). which kind of person are you? we all think, as Dobbs/Bogart did, that we would never become morally corrupted — yet we’ve seen in the real world (and as depicted in this movie) how that happens.

the arc of the Dobbs character is a classic in 2-hour cinema, and how Bogart portrays the transition from sanity and good-will into madness, greed & murder is up there with the greatest performances of any actor ever. the leprechaun magic of Walter Huston. the authenticity of the location shooting, including all the extras and bit roles. the depth, detail and polish of the script. the torn, sweat-soaked costumes. the fabulous music that mutates as the characters do.

if it was a standard western or movie in general, it all would have taken place in the first town and been about how they exacted revenge from the unscrupulous businessman who rips them off — the workers against the corporation.

but then the characters are taken beyond that to where they form their own limited partnership — and how some people turn out to be good and some don’t. it’s life.

if only we got to watch our own life movie several times until we got it. but since we can’t, you have another shot at this movie. it took my reincarnation as a viewer to finally get it right.

“It wouldn’t be that way with me. I swear it wouldn’t. I’d take only what I set out to get.”
😉
boy, would this be a great movie to see the alternate takes from!
and think how Walter Huston’s performance pushed Bogart.
Top 10 movie.
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the Seen Three Times list: be careful not to list movies you’ve seen twice!
— in order I thought of them.

Titanic — James Cameron
Luck
Phil The Alien
All The President’s Men
Waiting For Guffman — Christopher Guest
Clockwork Orange — Kubrick
Shawshank Redemption
It’s A Wonderful Life — Frank Capra
Some Like It Hot

Lost In La Mancha — doc on Terry Gilliam making movie
Giant – James Dean
Places In The Heart
Return of the Secaucus Seven — Sayles
Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolfe?
Sleepless in Seattle — Tom Hanks, Meg Ryan.
When Harry Met Sally — Tom Hanks, Meg Ryan.
Blow — 2001; Ted Demme; Johnny Depp, Jordi Molla, Paul Reubens.
Deliverance — Burt Reynolds, Jon Voight, Ned Beatty
2001: A Space Odyssey — Kubrick; Keir Dullea.

Caddyshack – Bill Murray, Rodney Dangerfield, Ted Knight.
The Grateful Dead Movie
Almost Famous — Cameron Crowe.
Raising Arizona — Coen brothers.
Face/Off — (1997) dir. John Woo; John Travolta, Nicolas Cage, Joan Allen, Gina Gershon, John Carroll Lynch (as the prison warden, was the husband in Fargo) and Harve Presnell (as the FBI, and was William H. Macy’s father-in-law in Fargo – made the year before this movie).
Midnight Cowboy — Dustin Hoffman, Jon Voight.
The Graduate — Dustin Hoffman.
Requiem for a Dream — 2000; Darren Aronofsky; Hubert Selby wrote; Jared Leno, Jennifer Connelly, Ellen Burstyn.
JFK — 1991; Oliver Stone; .
Being John Malkovich — 1999; Spike Jonze; written by Charlie Kaufman; Cusack, Cameron Diaz.

Stand By Me — 1986; Rob Reiner; written by Stephen King; Wil Wheaton, River Phoenix, Keifer Sutherland.
Misery — 1990, Rob Reiner; written by Stephen King; Kathy Bates, James Caan.
Mississippi Burning — Gene Hackman & Willem Defoe.
Midnight Run — 1988; Martin Brest; Robert De Niro & Charles Grodin.
Rain Man — 1988. — Dustin Hoffman, Tom Cruise.
Dances With Wolves — Kevin Costner.
Hannah and Her Sisters — Woody Allen, Michael Caine.
Dirty Rotten Scoundrels — Michael Caine, Steve Martin.
Planes, Trains and Automobiles — John Candy, Steve Martin.
Network — 1976; Sidney Lumet; Paddy Chayefsky; Peter Finch, Fay Dunaway, William Holden, Robert Duvall, Ned Beatty.

Papillion — 1973; dir. Franklin Schaffner; Dustin Hoffman & Steve McQueen. only AA nomination was for music!?
Little Big Man — Dustin Hoffman.
Cool Hand Luke — Paul Newman
The Wild One — Marlon Brando.
Arsenic and Old Lace — Cary Grant.
Miracle on 34th Street
The Thin Man — 1934, W.S. Van Dyke; written by Dashiell Hammett; William Powell & Myrna Loy; early classic climax scene with all suspects assembled in same room to reveal the murderer.
Live and Let Die! — Roger Moore.
Bowling For Columbine — Michael Moore.
E.T.

Men In Black — 1997; Barry Sonnenfeld; Will Smith, Tommy Lee Jones.
Mrs. Doubtfire — 1993; Robin Williams.
Pretty Woman — Julia Roberts, Richard Gere.
Tootsie — Dustin Hoffman, Jessica Lange, Bill Murray.
City Slickers — Billy Crystal.
On Golden Pond — Henry Fonda, Katherine Hepburn, Jane Fonda, Dabney Coleman.
American Graffiti — 1973; George Lucas; Richard Dreyfuss, Ron Howard, Cindy Williams, Wolfman Jack, Harrison Ford)
Analyze This — 1999; Crystal & De Niro.
Good Will Hunting — Matt Damon, Robin Williams.
Pulp Fiction — Quinten Tarantino

Kramer vs. Kramer — Dustin Hoffman, Meryl Streep.
Back To The Future — Robert Zemeckis.
Ferris Bueller’s Day Off — 1986; John Hughes; Matthew Broderick.
Flirting With Disaster — 1996; David O. Russell; Tea Leoni, Ben Stiller, Lily Tomlin, Alan Alda, Mary Tyler Moore, George Segal.
Hollywood Ending — 2002; Woody Allen; Tea Leoni.
Happy Accidents! — 2000; Brad Anderson; Vincent D’Onofrio, Marisa Tomei.
Carny — 1980; Robert Kaylor; Jodie Foster, Gary Busey, Robbie Robertson.
Swear To Tell The Truth — Lenny Bruce documentary — 1998; Robert Weide.
Wag The Dog — 1997; Barry Levinson; Robert DiNiro, Dustin Hoffman, Denis Leary, Anne Heche, Willie Nelson.
Zoolander — Ben Stiller, Owen Wilson.

Desperately Seeking Susan — Madonna.
Club Paradise — 1986; Harold Ramis; Robin Williams, Peter O’Toole, Rick Moranis & Eugene Levy {the two Barry’s}, Twiggy, Jimmy Cliff.
Phantom of the Paradise — Paul Williams.
Pleasantville
Diner – 1982; Barry Levinson; Kevin Bacon, Mickey Rourke, Paul Reiser, Daniel Stern, Ellen Barkin, Steve Guttenberg
Showtime – 2002; Tom Dey; Robert De Niro & Eddie Murphy
Primary Colors – 1998; John Travolta, Emma Thompson, Kathy Bates; about the Clintons, by Joe Klein
Glengarry Glen Ross – 1992; Mamet screenplay
I Love You To Death – 1990; Kevin Kline, Tracey Ullman, Joan Plowright, River Phoenix, William Hurt & Keanu Reeves

Bob Roberts – 1992 – written & directed by & starring Tim Robbins; plus Gore Vidal, and Ray Wise (the guy from Twin Peaks & Good Night, And Good Luck); tons of cameos, including a very young Jack Black; Robbins wrote and performed his own songs; done in mock-documentary style; this could almost be on the Most Disturbing List, and is particularly scary post Iraq War II;

Haiku Tunnel
Trees Lounge – Steve Buscemi wrote, directed and stars
The War Room – Clinton’s 1992 Presidential campaign doc.
Pushing Tin — 1999; Mike Newell; Billy Bob Thornton, Angelina Jolie, John Cusack. not to mention Cate Blanchett and Vicki “NewsRadio” Lewis — fantastic performances by all. Plus a cameo by the great John Carroll Lynch (husband Norm in Fargo) as the scared Dr. Freeze.

Shut Up and Sing – 2006 – Dixie Chicks (seen twice) mindblowingly great — it’s like Don’t Look Back in so many ways — London, controversy, news + backstage + stage + young performer(s) caught in a contemporary controversy . . . Rick Rubin scene in the middle is super insightful – core of the movie. plus they play an awesome version of Bob Dylan’s “Mississippi” at one of the climaxes of the movie. Also, Toronto has a sweet and proud cameo.
The Gates – Albert Maysles – amazing doc about Christo’s show in Central Park

I’m Not There – 2007 – Todd Haynes; Cate Blanchett (just fantastic!), Richard Gere, Health Ledger, Christian Bale, Marcus Carl Franken (the little black boy), Julianne Moore (as the Joan Baez character), David Cross (as Allen Ginsberg), Richie Havens, Michelle Williams (briefly), Kris Kristofferson (narrator); great! a surreal symphony! (I wrote a review for this on BH.com and IMDB.)

28 Days – Sandra Bullock – about rehab, really good; small role for Steve Buchemi

(86)

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movies that were so effectively disturbing, I don’t want to see again:

Rosemary’s Baby – 1968; Roman Polanski; Mia Farrow, Ruth Gordon, John Cassavetes (Guy), Charles Grodin
Midnight Express – 1978; Alan Parker; written by Billy Hayes; Brad Davis, John Hurt (Max), Randy Quaid.
Grizzly Man — 2005; Warner Herzog; Timothy Treadwell.
Schindler’s List – 1993; Steven Spielberg.
The Exorcist — 1973; William Friedkin; William Peter Blatty; Linda Blair, Ellen Burstyn, Max von Sydow.
Harsh Times – Christian Bale
(6)

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The Movies about Making Movies:

The Big Picture
The Player
State & Main
Hollywood Ending
Living in Oblivion — 1995; writ & dir. Tom DiCillo; Steve Buscemi.
The Independent — 2000; Jerry Stiller, Janeane Garofalo, Ben Stiller, a zillion cameos. funny
I Love Your Work — Giovanni Ribisi, tons of cameos, Elvis C, Vince Vaughan, Jason Lee,
docs:
Lost in La Mancha
Heart of Darkness: A Filmmaker’s Apocalypse — 1991; writ & dir by Fax Bahr, George Hickenlooper;
The Kid Stays In The Picture – 2002; Nanette Burstein, Brett Morgan; from Robert Evans book; Robert Evans and most of Hollywood.
(5 – not on other lists)

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the Made-for-TV Exceptions:

Fawlty Towers – BBC; 1975 and 1979 (6 episodes in each year, 12 total); ? dir ?; written by John Cleese & Connie Booth; Cleese, Prunella Scales (Sybil), Andrew Sachs (Manuel), Connie (Polly), Ballard Berkely (the Major).
True West — PBS; 1984; Allan Goldstein; Sam Shepard; John Malkovich & Gary Sinise.
Death of A Salesman — CBS; 1985; Victor Schlondorff; Arthur Miller; Dustin Hoffman, John Malkovich, Kate Reid, Charles Durning.
The Civil War — PBS; 1990; Ken Burns; made by Florentine Films for WETA PBS in Washington, D.C.
Magical Mystery Tour — 1967; dir by George Harrison!? and Bernard Knowles; The Beatles.
Liza with a ‘Z’ — NBC; Sept. 10, 1972; dir & choreographed by Bob Fosse; Liza Minnelli; Marvin Hamlisch musical Director; Phil Ramone engineer; won 4 Emmy’s, best Single program, best Director, best Choreography, best music; shot live, one take.
“The Campaign” – The Newsroom episode – Ken Finkleman
Canada-Russia ’72 (CBC; 2006) unbelievably great

(8)
(107 + 86 + 5 + 4 + 8 = 210 total)
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zip.ca

Movies I want to see — for the first time, or again: (These movie are NOT on the master “seen” list — may be added as viewed)

Once Around – (seen once) would love to see again – Richard Dryfuss, Holly Hunter, Danny Aiello, — funny wild bizarre family comedy

Zodiac – 2007 – Jake Gyllenhaal (see twice) LOVED it. totally surprised — i’m not a seriel killer fan at all — other than Scorsese there’s not many movies with much killing on my list. there’s not much in this either, but again, it’s just not a movie i would normally watch — but, like many a great movie, i discovered it cuz it was on regular rotation on the movie network. first of all, i LOVE Jack Gyllanhalle, AND his sister Maggie!
i love how it’s set in a newspaper newsroom, and how the JG character is a lowly guy with ideas.
also — Robert Downey is his typical great self.
and just his whole pursuit of how he tries to track the killer down is a well-told story.
plus i love that it’s a period piece set in the 70s and also set in and around SF, one of my very favorite cities.
also — Great Casting — all the secondary / supporting roles are just perfectly cast. (another big thing i appreciate in films)

Abbott & Costello Meet Frankenstein — 1948; Charles Barton; Bug Abbott & Lou Costello, Bela Lugosi, Lon Chaney; Jerry Garcia’s favorite movie. (seen once)
Dr. Strangelove — 1964; Stanley Kubrick; Peter Sellers — 3 roles., George C Scott (seen twice)
A Prairie Home Companion — 2006; Robert Altman; Garrison Keiller; (see twice). boring, even though it’s Altman, etc.
The Cocoanuts – 1929; Marx Brothers – Florida real estate (seen twice)
Wallace & Gromit in the Curse of the Were-Rabbit — 2005 (seen once)
The Comedy of Terrors – 1964; Jacques Tourneur; – Vincent Price (great), Boris Karloff, Peter Lorre, Basil Rathbone, bizarre funny black comedy parody of the horror genre; very much like Young Frankenstein, or Beat The Devil. soundtrack funny too. (have most of it on VHS) (seen once)
East of Eden – James Dean (seen twice)
The Maltese Falcon — 1941; John Huston; written by Dashell Hammett & John Huston; Humphrey Bogart, Sydney Greenstreet, Peter Lorre, Mary Astor) (seen twice)
Donnie Brasco – 1997; Mike Newell; Al Pacino, Johnny Depp

Good Night, and Good Luck — (seen twice) — David Strathairn, Ray Wise.
Miller’s Crossing
Touch of Evil — Orson Wells (see once)
On The Waterfront – Kazan’s justification for giving names to the McCarthy hearings — (Kazan in Brando role) won best picture, director, actor, screenplay
The Crucible – Arthur Miller’s reaction to Kazan testifying before McCarthy hearings; John Proctor as Arthur Miller — final speech.
The Front — staring Woody Allen, but not written by him; about the McCarthy hearings. (seen once)
A View From The Bridge (Vu du pont) 1961; Sidney Lumet; Maureen Stapleton; one act play. Miller’s response to Kazan’s On The Waterfront. B&W 110 min.
Lenny – docudrama on Lenny Bruce — Dustin Hoffman, Valerie Perine — seen once.
Lenny Bruce Performance Film – 1965 (late-career “routine” but mostly a broken down rant)
Laurel Canyon — (seen twice) — 2002; dir & written Lisa Cholodenko; Kate Beckinsale! Frances McDormand. “inspired by” Joni Mitchell

Ruby in Paradise — 1993; Ashley Judd (seen once)
The Fisher King — 1991; Terry Gilliam; Robin Williams, Jeff Bridges (seen twice – hard to get through)
Pay It Forward – Kevin Spacey (seen twice)
Silver City – 2004; dir & written by John Sayles; Chris Cooper, Tim Roth. about politics
This Film Is Not Yet Rated – 2006; dir. Kirby Dick; doc about film ratings. (seen once)
Coney Island – Ric Burns doc (60 min) (Joey pick)
The Donar Party – Rick Burns (Joey pick)
National Treasure – 2004; partially about the Templars (Dunc) (have on VHS)
Withnail & I — 1987 British comedy, set in 1969 (Cutts recommendation)
Iraq For Sale: The War Profiteers — 2006; Robert Greenwald (doc)

Eulogy – (saw once) 2004 – Zooey Deschanel, Hank Azaria, Ray Romano, Debra Winger, Piper Laurie, Glenne Headly; really funny, absolutely great black-comedy about family funeral

* Drop Dead Gorgeous – 1999; Michael Patrick Jann; Kristen Dunst, Alison Janney, Denise Richards, Ellen Barkin, Kirstie Alley, Nora Dunn; twisted dark comedy; pretty dumb, but some surprising spitter lines! Prairie Home Companion & Fargo meets Spinal Tap fake doc.
Soylent Green – 1973; Edward G. Robonson, Joseph Cotton, Charlton Heston, Dick Van Patten, numerous people have recommended it, and referenced it.
Marilyn Monroe: The Final Days (2001, AMC) amazing doc, with the 37 missing min. of last film “Something’s Got To Give
Factotum – Matt Dillon portraying Bukowski – Albert recommendation
I Know I’m Not Alone – 2005 – Michael Franti – goes to Baghdad and Gaza, funny guerilla doc. – Albert recommendation
* Paris When it Sizzles – 1964 — pretty surreal and comedic! Audrey Hepburn, William Holden – about a screenwriter and his girl,- “the screenplay within the screenplay”
Coffee & Cigarettes – Jim Jarmush (Megan & Adam in PA)
Office Space — 1999 – dir. Mike Judge; Ron Livingston, Jennifer Anniston (Judge did Beavis & Butthead – so it’s kind of that take on corporate life (seen twice)
“The Rocket” (aka “Maurice Richard”) – 2006 – this, along with Miracle may be the 2 best sports dramas.

Miracle – 1980 U.S. hockey team gold medal – Kurt Russell as Herb Brooks
Cookie’s Fortune – 1999; Altman
These Girls — 2005; comedy – 3 girls, the dude in town (seen twice) have on VHS
Mr. Smith Goes To Washington — (seen twice) mom would like
City Lights – Chaplin – one of the top rated of all time
Modern Times – Chaplin – one of the top rated of all time
The Brothers Grimm – 2005 — Terry Gilliam – saw once 2/07 – AMAZING – another Gilliam masterpiece – gorgeous Lena Headley, like a young Jaquiline Bisset – also about writing! the sets are to die for (as usual in Gilliam movies) and it’s about forests (where I like to spend my days!) “You’re my brother. I want you to believe in me.” Jacob Grimm Ghostbusters from the 1800s
Smoke – Megan and others keep quoting it.
The Shining – Steven Weber, Rebecca de Mornay – really scary, actually better than Kubrick’s (seen once)
Blades of Glory – comedy about figure skating, Will Farrell

Monty Python episode – party-crashing scene
Mystery Alaska – funny hockey movie, Russell Crowe, Hank Azaria, Michael McKean, Burt Reynolds, Phil Esposito, Mike Myers, Terry David Mulligan, Little Richard, Mary McCormick
Kinky Friedman: Live from Austin, Texas — 1975 PBS Austin City Limits – never aired, released 2007
Tucker – Jeff Bridges, about re-life Preston Tucker the car inventor – great! (seen twice)
The Battle of San Pedro – documentary — 1944-ish – dir. John Huston
Bullworth (seen twice) – Warren Beatty
Nixon – Anthony Hopkins
Bird – dir. Clint Eastwood – extraordinary Charlie Parker bio-pic (seen twice)
Man of The Year – (2006) — Robin Williams (seen twice) – he says many lines similar to Obama. this is made shortly after Obama’s speech at the DNC Convention in 2004.
Straight, No Chaser – the Thelonious Monk documentary

State of The Union – Spencer Tracey, Katherine Hepburn, Angela Lansbury (seen once)
Dave – Kevin Kline — great political comedy
Ocean’s Eleven – Sinatra version – (seen it twice)
Thirteen Days – (2000) – great historical political drama about the Cuban Missile Crisis; Kevin Costner (seen once) great movie – cuz of the subject (parts of the script were taken from transcripts of Oval Office conversations) and the portrayal of the two Kennedy brothers.
No Country For Old Men – (seen twice) SUCH a first-view movie; Mesmerizing on first viewing; very so-so on second. this movie is all “style” — there’s plot holes and bad scenes all thru this – no wonder the Coen’s were surprised they won Best Picture, and acted like they didn’t deserve it. I can sure see why JB won best actor. riveting memorable performance. But I needed closed-captions to understand what many of the others were saying. It’s very disturbing, like Natural Born Killers.

Short Cuts – 1993 – Robert Altman; (seen twice) there’s no through-plot to follow – it’s a series loosely connected scenes of lives in and around LA; it’s hard to watch
The Beach – 2000 — DiCaprio, Tilda Swenson (seen twice)
Sicko – 2007 – Michael Moore – fantastic doc. (seen twice)
Let’s All Hate Toronto (2007) doc 75 min. by Albert Nerenberg and Rob Spence – very funny, very well done doc. (seen a few min. of it – seems Great)
Blood Diamond – DiCaprio (seen twice)

Taking of Pelham 1 2 3 – Walter Matheau, Robert Shaw, Martin Balsim – (seen twice)
Little Children – 2006 – Kate Winslett, Jane Adams, Jennifer Connely, Patrick Watson – amazing, powerful, stayed with me – Jane Adams character, and the haters. (since once)
Prey For Rock n Roll – (2003) — Gina Gershon, Drea de Matteo – two robo-babes in an all-girl rock n roll band – very authentic (written by a rock n roller) (seen twice)

(75)

= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =
movies — from above list. that you’ve seen 4 or more times but don’t really plan to / need to see again:
— which also means, to some extent, that you don’t really recommend the film to others.
except – if somebody’s never seen one of these movies, they should.
every one of these movies should be seen once, if you’ve never seen it.
Star Wars
Happy Birthday, Wanda June
Wizard of Oz
Planet of the Apes
Back to the Future
The Poseidon Adventure
Phantom of the Paradise

= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =

Comedies: [59]

Fargo — Coen brothers.
Lucky Numbers — Ephron.
State & Main — Mamet.
The Curse of The Jade Scorpion — Allen.
It’s A Mad Mad Mad Mad World
Best In Show — Guest.
Spinal Tap — Reiner.
Happy Birthday Wanda June
The Big Picture — Guest!.
Monty Python and the Holy Grail
Groundhog Day
What About Bob? — Frank Oz.
Annie Hall — Allen.
Young Frankenstein — Mel Brooks.
all 12 episodes of Fawlty Towers
Hudsucker Proxy — Coen brothers.
Beat The Devil — Huston.
Throw Mama From The Train — Danny DeVito.
The War of The Roses — Danny DeVito.
Funny Farm — George Roy Hill!.
Big Business — Jim Abrahams; starring Better Midler & Lily Tomlin.
The Ladykillers — 2004. — Coen Brothers.
A Hard Day’s Night — Richard Lester; starring The Beatles.
Fast Times At Ridgemont High — 1982; Any Heckerling; written Cameron Crowe; starring Sean Penn, Jennifer Jason Leigh, Phoebe Cates.
The Blues Brothers!
Harold and Maude!!
Being There!
MASH!!!
Duck Soup! — Freedonia!. — 1933, Leo McCarey; Groucho, Chico, Harpo, Zeppo Marx, Margaret Dumont.
The Ghost and Mr. Chicken!!!! — Don Knotts! — have on VHS, with captions
Meet The Parents
Ghostbusters
The Birdcage
Animal House
My Cousin Vinny
Trading Places
Beetlejuice — 1988; Tim Burton; Michael Keaton, Winona Ryder, Geena Davis, Alec Baldwin, Catherine O’Hara, Jeffrey Jones, Robert Goulet, Dick Cavett; Keaton’s only on scene 17 min., but with Burton’s permission, totally created the vibe of the movie, and is his favorite movie that he’s in..
A Fish Called Wanda — 1988; Charles Crichton; John Cleese, Michael Palin, Jamie Lee Curtis, Kevin Kline.
——– — below: seen 3 times. ——-
Phil The Alien
Some Like It Hot
Waiting For Guffman — Chris Guest.
Caddyshack
Dirty Rotten Scoundrels — Michael Caine, Steve Martin.
Planes, Trains and Automobiles — John Candy, Steve Martin.
Arsenic and Old Lace — Cary Grant.
Men In Black
Mrs. Doubtfire — 1993.
City Slickers
Analyze This — 1999; Crystal & De Niro.
Ferris Bueller’s Day Off — 1986; John Hughes; Matthew Broderick.
Flirting With Disaster — 1996; David O. Russell; Tea Leoni, Ben Stiller, Lily Tomlin, Alan Alda, Mary Tyler Moore, George Segal.
Hollywood Ending — 2002; Woody Allen; Tea Leoni.
Happy Accidents! — 2000; Brad Anderson; Vincent D’Onofrio & Marisa Tomei.
The Aristocrats
Drop Dead Gorgeous
The Comedy of Terrors
Office Space — 1999 – dir. Mike Judge; Ron Livingston, Jennifer Anniston (Judge did Beavis & Butthead – so it’s kind of that take on corporate life)
I Love You To Death – 1990; Kevin Kline, Tracey Ullman, Joan Plowright, River Phoenix, William Hurt & Keanu Reeves
National Lampoon’s Vacation – 1983 – dir; Harold Ramis; written by John Hughes, Chevy Chase, Beverly D’Angelo, Randy Quad, Imogene Coca
National Lampoon’s European Vacation – 1985 – dir. Amy Heckerling; written by John Hughes; Chevy Chase, Beverly D’Angelo,
= = = = = = = = = = = = = = =

Serious, Compelling Dramas — non-comedies, even tho they might have funny bits.: [91]

Rear Window — Hitch.
Fargo
Goodfellas — Scorcese.
In The Heat of The Night — Norman Jewison – Torontonian.
The Talented Mr. Ripley — Anthony Minghella.
Airport — ’70. — George Seaton.
The Player — Altman.
Matewan — Sayles.
Psycho — Hitchcock.
North By Northwest — Hitchcock.

Forrest Gump — Robert Zemeckis.
Masked & Anonymous — 2003; Larry Charles; Dylan.
One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest — Milos Foreman.
The Shining — Stanley Kubrick.
Memento — Chris Nolan.
Butch Cassidy & The Sundance Kid — George Roy Hill.
Rebel Without A Cause — Nick Ray.
Citizen Kane — Wells.
Hudsucker Proxy — Coen brothers.
Round Midnight — Bertrand Tavernier.

True West — for PBS. — 1984; Allan Goldstein; Sam Shepard; John Malkovich & Gary Sinise.
Death of A Salesman — for PBS. — 1985; Victor Schlondorff; Arthur Miller; Dustin Hoffman, John Malkovich, Kate Reid, Charles Durning.
A Streetcar Named Desire — Kazan.
Lust For Life — Vincente Minelli, father of Liza.
Cat On A Hot Tin Roof — Richard Brooks.
Dead Poets Society — Peter Weir.
The Poseidon Adventure — 1973; Ronald Neame.
Paper Moon — Peter Bogdanovich.
Secret Window — David Koepp; starring Johnny Depp.
The Haunting — Jan de Bont; starring Catherine Zeta-Jones.

Apocalypse Now — Coppola.
Bonnie & Clyde — 1967; Arthur Penn; starring Warren Beatty, Faye Dunaway.
The Devil’s Advocate — 1997; Taylor Hackford; Al Pacino, Charlize Theron, Keanu Reeves, Jeffrey Jones.
Jaws!
Sling Blade! — 1996.
The Untouchables
Sleuth — 1972; Joseph Mankiewicz; written by Anthony Schaffer; Lawrence Oliver, Michael Caine.
Deathtrap — 1982; Sidney Lumet; Michael Caine, Christopher Reeve, Dyan Cannon.
Harold and Maude!!
Being There!

The French Connection!
MASH!!!
The Civil War — Ken Burns. — one of the 4 made-for-TV exceptions.
Quiz Show!!
Ghost
Cast Away
Breakdown! — 1997; Jonathon Mostow; Kurt Russell, J.T. Walsh, Kathleen Quinlan.
the Three Times on-the-fence list: (dramas cont.)

Titanic — James Cameron.
Luck
All The President’s Men

Clockwork Orange — Kubrick.
Shawshank Redemption
It’s A Wonderful Life — Capra?.
Treasure of the Sierra Madre — Huston.
Lost In La Mancha
Giant
Places In The Heart
Return of the Secaucus Seven — Sayles.
Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolfe?
Blow — Ted Demme; Johnny Depp.

Deliverance
2001: A Space Odyssey — Kubrick.
Almost Famous — Cameron Crowe.
Face/Off
Midnight Cowboy
The Graduate
Requiem for a Dream — 2000.
JFK — 1991; Oliver Stone.
Being John Malkovich — 1999; Spike Jonze; written by Charlie Kaufman; Cusack, Cameron Diaz.
Stand By Me — 1986; Rob Reiner; written by Stephen King; Wil Wheaton, River Phoenix, Keifer Sutherland.

Misery — 1990, Rob Reiner; written by Stephen King; Kathy Bates, James Caan.
Mississippi — Gene Hackman & Willem Defoe.
Midnight Run — 1988; Martin Brest; Robert De Niro & Charles Grodin.
Rain Man — 1988. — Dustin Hoffman, Tom Cruise.
Dances With Wolves — Kevin Costner.
Hannah and Her Sisters — Woody Allen, Michael Caine.
Network
Papillion — Dustin Hoffman, Steve McQueen.
Little Big Man — Dustin Hoffman.
Cool Hand Luke — Paul Newman

The Wild One — Marlon Brando.
The Thin Man — 1934, W.S. Van Dyke; written by Dashiell Hammett; William Powell & Myrna Loy; early classic climax scene with all suspects assembled in same room to reveal the murderer.
Live and Let Die
On Golden Pond
Good Will Hunting
Pulp Fiction
Kramer vs. Kramer
Happy Accidents! — 2000; Brad Anderson; Vincent D’Onofrio, Marisa Tomei.
Carny — 1980; Robert Kaylor; Jodie Foster, Gary Busey, Robbie Robertson.
Swear To Tell The Truth — Lenny Bruce documentary — 1998; Robert Weide.

Wag The Dog — 1997; Barry Levinson; Robert DiNiro, Dustin Hoffman, Denis Leary, Anne Heche, Willie Nelson.
= = = = = = = = = = = = = = =

Music Movies: [14]

Woodstock — Wadleigh.
The Last Waltz — Scorsese.
Festival Express — Bob Smeaton.
Don’t Look Back — Pennebaker.
Masked & Anonymous — Larry Charles, Dylan.
Spinal Tap — Reiner.
Round Midnight — Bertrand Tavernier.
Jesus Christ Superstar! — Norman Jewison.
Hair — Milos Foreman.
That Thing You Do! — Tom Hanks!.
A Hard Day’s Night — Richard Lester; starring The Beatles.
Cabaret
Yellow Submarine
The Blues Brothers
Magical Mystery Tour — 1967; dir by George Harrison!? and Bernard Knowles; The Beatles.
Liza with a ‘Z’ — 1972; dir & choreographed by Bob Fosse; Liza Minnelli; Marvin Hamlisch musical Director; Phil Ramone engineer; won 4 Emmy’s, best Single program, best Director, best Choreography, best music.
= = = = = = = = = = = = = =

Documentaries: [13]

Woodstock
The Last Waltz
Festival Express
Don’t Look Back
The Civil War
Lost in La Mancha
Dogtown and Z-Boys
Bowling For Columbine
Grizzly Man
Swear To Tell The Truth — Lenny Bruce
The Aristocrats
Marilyn Monroe: The Final Days (2001, AMC) amazing doc, with the 37 missing min. of last film “Something’s Got To Give
The War Room
The Gates – Albert Maysles – amazing doc about Christo’s show in Central Park
= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =

Great Movies about Politics (15)

Primary Colors
Mr. Smith Goes To Washington
All The President’s Men
The Candidate
Wag The Dog
Bullworth
Bob Roberts – Tim Robbins
Nixon – Anthony Hopkins
Man of The Year – Robin Williams
The Newsroom’s The Campaign episode – Ken Finkleman
The War Room – documentary of ’92 campagin
State of The Union – Spencer Tracy & Katherine Hepburn, Angela Lansbury
Dave – Kevin Kline
Run, Granny, Run – 94 year old Doris ‘Granny D’ Haddock’s run for the 2004 New Hampshire Senate seat
Recount – about the 200 election – HBO – amazing! Kevin Spacey
The American President – Michael Douglas
Charlie Wilson’s War

= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =

By Auteur: am I counting 3 timers on this? I should be.

Rear Window — Hitchcock
Psycho — Hitchcock
North By Northwest — Hitchcock

Fargo — Coen brothers
Hudsucker Proxy — Coen brothers
The Ladykillers — 2004 — Coen Brothers

The Sting — George Roy Hill
Butch Cassidy & The Sundance Kid — George Roy Hill
Funny Farm — George Roy Hill!

Animal House — John Landis
Blues Brothers — Landis
Trading Places — Landis
The Player — Altman
M*A*S*H – Altman

Best In Show — Guest.
The Big Picture — Guest

Goodfellas — Scorsese
The Last Waltz — Scorsese

The Curse of The Jade Scorpion — Woody Allen
Annie Hall — Allen

One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest — Milos Foreman
Hair — Foreman

Forrest Gump — Robert Zemeckis
Back To The Future — Zemeckis

In The Heat of The Night — Norman Jewison (Torontonian!)
Jesus Christ Superstar! — Norman Jewison

Throw Mama From The Train — Danny DeVito
The War of The Roses — Danny DeVito

Star Wars — George Lucas
American Graffiti – George Lucas

Lucky Numbers — Ephron
Sleepless In Seattle – Ephron

Matewan — John Sayles
Return of the Secaucus 7 — Sayles

State & Main — Mamet
Wag The Dog – Mamet screenplay
Glengarry Glen Ross – Mamet screenplay
The Untouchables – Mamet screenplay

A Streetcar Named Desire — Kazan. written by Tennessee Williams
Cat On A Hot Tin Roof — Richard Brooks. written by Tennessee Williams

Woodstock — Wadleigh.
Festival Express — Bob Smeaton.
The Talented Mr. Ripley — Anthony Minghella.
Airport — ’70. — George Seaton.
It’s A Mad Mad Mad Mad World — Stanley Kramer.
Don’t Look Back — Pennebaker.
Masked & Anonymous — Larry Charles, Dylan.
The Big Chill — Lawrence Kasdan.
Happy Birthday Wanda June — Mark Robson; written Kurt Vonnegut.
The Shining — Stanley Kubrick.
Memento — Chris Nolan.
The Wizard of Oz — Victor Fleming.
Monty Python and the Holy Grail — Terry Gilliam.
Groundhog Day — Harold Ramis.
What About Bob? — Frank Oz.
Rebel Without A Cause — Nick Ray.
Citizen Kane — Wells.
Young Frankenstein — Mel Brooks.
all 12 episodes of Fawlty Towers — Cleese.
Round Midnight — Bertrand Tavernier.
The Planet of The Apes — Franklin Shaffner.
Beat The Devil — Huston.
True West — PBS – Malkovich & Sinese.
Death of A Salesman — PBS, Hoffman & Sinese.
Pull My Daisy — Robert Frank, Alfred Leslie.
Lust For Life — Vincente Minelli, father of Liza.
Dead Poets Society — Peter Weir.
The Poseidon Adventure — Ronald Neame.
Paper Moon — Peter Bogdanovich.
Secret Window — David Koepp.
Big Business — Jim Abrahams.
That Thing You Do! — Tom Hanks!.
The Haunting — Jan de Bont.
A Hard Day’s Night — Richard Lester.
Apocalypse Now — Coppola.
Fast Times At Ridgemont High — Any Heckerling.
Bonnie & Clyde — Arthur Penn.

================================

Best / Favorite Scenes Ever in a Film:

Marisa Tomei on the stand in My Cousin Vinny
William Hickey’s cookie scene in Prizzi’s Honor
Pottier & Steiger’s first scene in In The Heat of the Night
the final Jordi Molla – Johnny Depp confrontation in Blow
Kathleen Turner & Michael Douglas – dinner party Bacarat story scene
Favorite / Unforgettable — greatest? Acting Performances Ever:
— in order I thought of them.

Joe Pesci in Goodfellas
William Hickey in Happy Birthday Wanda June
Billy Bob Thornton in Sling Blade
Bill Murray & Richard Dreyfuss in What About Bob?
William Macy in Fargo
Ruth Gordon in Harold & Maude
Mia Farrow in Rosemarie’s Baby
Brad Davis in Midnight Express
John Travolta in Lucky Numbers
Tom Hanks in Forrest Gump
Dexter Gordon in Round Midnight
Gene Hackman in French Connection
Nathan Lane in The Birdcage
J.T. Walsh in anything — Breakdown, The Big Picture, Sling Blade, Good Morning Vietnam, A Few Good Men, Pleasantville, Nixon.
Richard Burton & Elizabeth Taylor in Virginia Woolfe
Dustin Hoffman in Papilion
David Strathairn in Good Night and Good Luck
Ray Wise in Good Night and Good Luck
Cate Blanchett in Aviator
Brad Davis in Midnight Express

==============================================

Best overall bunch of actors in one film (ensemble?):

Talented Mr. Ripley
Lucky Numbers
++Cat on a Hot Tin Roof
That Thing You Do
Spinal Tap
A Hard Days Night
Throw Mama From the Train
Beetlejuice
Duck Soup
Mad Mad Mad Mad World
Midnight Express
Glengarry Glen Ross

 

= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =

 

Or here’s a cool riff with about a hundred actors and actresses on it — Famous People Who Didn’t Have Kids.

Or here’s a bunch of films I reviewed on IMDB.

Or here’s some little movies I made about Woodstock, the Beats, and the Merry Pranksters.

Or here’s a book I wrote — “The Hitchhiker’s Guide to Jack Kerouac” — that’s like one big movie.

Or here’s from the London premiere of On The Road in the courtyard of Somerset House.

And here was the world premiere of the new shorter version of On The Road at the Toronto Film Festival.

Or here’s an overview of all the Beat movie dramatizations ever filmed.

Or here’s a review of the lost footage of the historic roc n roll train trip that was finally released as Festival Express, starring the Grateful Dead, The Band and Janis Joplin.

Or here’s a review of the brilliant surreal masterpiece interpreting Bob Dylan — I’m Not There.

Or here’s the Scorsese’s Rolling Stones concert film — Shine A Light.

Or here’s a fairly unknown but perfectly offbeat comedy — Lucky Numbers — with a comedic Travolta, Lisa Kudrow, Tim Roth, Michael Rapaport, Richard Schiff, Michael Moore and many others.

Or here’s one of the funny-cool twisted movie — My Dinner With Jimi — about Hendrix and London and the mid-sixties music scene.

= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =

by Brian Hassett            karmacoupon@gmail.com                    brianhassett.com

 

Tags: ···········

6 responses so far ↓

  • 1 Paula // Oct 6, 2010 at 6:07 PM

    A personal comment on “Soylent Green”. I very often think of Edward G. Robinson in this film (his last) when I’m shopping for produce. Fresh strawberries are one of my life-long favorite foods and buy them so seldom anymore (like maybe once every few years, if I’m lucky) that I ALWAYS think of him when I do.
    I didn’t catch “Out of the Past” on your list but maybe missed it. I just finally saw that (twice) a few years ago and thought it was a real “Wow!!”
    I’ll try to come up with any that I can recommend that aren’t on your list, when I can go through it again.
    Paula

  • 2 Alex Nantes // Oct 10, 2010 at 11:47 PM

    You are the King of Lists! 🙂

    Love your one from earlier about Famous People without Kids!

    Write on!

  • 3 Brian // Oct 11, 2010 at 9:49 AM

    Thanks! You mean this one?

    http://brianhassett.com/2010/06/people-who-dont-have-kids/

    Yeah, I love it, too. 😉

  • 4 Jennifer Knox // Nov 1, 2010 at 11:37 AM

    Amazing list! Amazing movies!

  • 5 Ben Kleiman // Mar 23, 2012 at 9:59 PM

    Love your “Four or More” system! Funny. But perfect. and perfectly true.

  • 6 Sarah Cattell // Aug 12, 2013 at 8:53 PM

    Thanks for the tips! Now we got a bunch of new ones to order.

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